Welcome to the family Blog

Three images I’ve looked at today coming out of the family blog. Top is a cute brown thornbill nestling in the thorns at Natural Newstead (see blog 6). Middle is a cartoon relating to academics obsession with quantity being discussed by Ideas for Sustainability (see blog 3). And bottom is an image of an urban silvereye. QAEG scientists have discovered urban silvereyes sing different songs to their country cousins (see blog 4). It’s a bit like different blogs. We sing similar songs in different dialects.

Hello CLEAR-as-Blog readers. Are there any of you still out there? It’s been a long time between drinks.

Pia and Karen posted something last week but before that our last blog was in December 2011. We’ll try to do a bit better from here on. In this instalment, I’d like to introduce you to some of the cousins of CLEAR-as-Blog. The extended family, so to speak. In so doing it becomes apparent that there are many different types of blogs serving different needs and desires.

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Resilience – what’s all the buzz?

Are buzzwords valuable devices that serve to inject emerging ideas into the national debate? Or are they shameful deceits used by political leaders to avoid being held to account? And is ‘resilience’ the new buzzword of our times?

In recent years I’ve been amused and somewhat cynical about the use and abuse of buzzwords such as ‘sustainability’ and ‘ecosystem health’. It seemed that while valuable thought had gone into promoting these terms as goals of policy and management, less consideration had gone into how you actually account for them.

For some, however, maybe that’s not a problem. These words represent noble aspirations. Maybe it doesn’t matter if what they mean is a bit blurry. Read more of this post

The cost of being internationally relevant

Are Australian species and ecosystems really that freakishly different from the rest of the world that our work isn’t applicable elsewhere? And are conservation efforts in Australia ultimately losing out because of this?
 

One seriously unique freaky Australian: the platypus. Image: Stefan Kraft.

I have just returned from Germany, where I had the pleasure of presenting the findings of my Travelling Stock Route-related work to the Institute of Ecology at Leuphana University in Lüneburg. I think the presentation was well-received, and at the end I got asked lots of probing questions from apparently interested people. Now, of course there is a chance that this nice group were just being polite, and taking pity on me with my ridiculous accent and excessive gesticulation. But others I spoke to during the week also seemed to show a genuine interest.

Why did I find this so surprising? Read more of this post

Biodiversity for the people

An increasingly common road sign for our future

Crack open the champagne, pass out the cigars – we have a birth to celebrate! Well, actually, many births. According to the United Nations’ Population Division, the world’s population has just reached seven billion. But the celebrations have undercurrents of despair. With human population pressure cited as one of the biggest stressors on global sustainability, how many more people can the earth realistically support? And given that the majority of people live in urban areas (with urbanisation a massive stressor in itself) is there anything can be done? Or, more importantly, is there anything ethically that can be done? Read more of this post